What does Jerusalem refer to in the Bible?

A holy city for Jews (see also Jews), Christians (see also Christian), and Muslims; the capital of the ancient kingdom of Judah and of the modern state of Israel. The name means “city of peace.” Jerusalem is often called Zion; Mount Zion is the hill on which the fortress of the city was built.

What does Jerusalem represent in Bible?

Jerusalem, then, is a place of deep sorrow, utter desolation but also of hope and redemption. It is the sacred heart of the Christian story.

When was Jerusalem first mentioned in the Bible?

Radiocarbon dating has determined it dates back to the 7th century BC. This is the time of the First Temple, which, according to the Hebrew Bible, was constructed by King Solomon in 957 B.C. and then destroyed 400 years later by the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar, who exiled many Jews.

Why is Jerusalem referred to as the Holy Land?

For Christians, the Land of Israel is considered holy because of its association with the birth, ministry, crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus, whom Christians regard as the Savior or Messiah.

What is the difference between Zion and Jerusalem?

The Bible has two different ways of speaking about two objects of God’s love: Israel and Zion. Israel is masculine, and Zion/Jerusalem is feminine. The difference between the two is more visible in Hebrew which distinguishes masculine and feminine in the verbs as well as in the adjectives.

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What is the difference between the city of Jerusalem and the New Jerusalem?

One of the most obvious differences is, the dimensions of the New Jerusalem of Rev. 21 are 1000 times bigger than dimensions of the city in Ezekiel 48 (and in Rev. 20:9) New Jerusalem of Revelation 21 is 2225 km.

Is Jerusalem in Israel or Palestine?

Jerusalem

Jerusalem ירושלים (Hebrew) القُدس (Arabic)
Claimed by Israel and Palestine
Israeli district Jerusalem
Palestinian governorate Quds
Gihon Spring settlement 3000–2800 BCE
Israel travel guide